Understanding in-car smartphone usage pattern with an un-obfuscated observation

SNU + UW iSchool Joint Workshop 2014 / Proceeding @ CHI EA '14 The spread

  1. Changhoon Oh
    SNU + UW iSchool Joint Workshop 2014 / Proceeding @ CHI EA '14
    The spread
    Transcript Header:
    Understanding in-car smartphone usage pattern with an un-obfuscated observation
    Transcript Body:
    • 1. Good Morning! Information School, University of Washington!
    • 2. Welcome To ! ! ! ! ! SEoul NAtional University!
    • 3. I aam CChannghhooon OOhh. a third-year PHD Candidate in UXlab @ SNU UX / HCI Research Major
    • 4. USER EXPERIENCE LAB
    • 5. Prof. Joon Lee • the Captain of User Experience LAB • Tried to Travel Around the World By His Yacht. • Lives in “The Gangnam” District. • Creative and Thoughtful
    • 6. Research Area User Research Information Architecture
    • 7. Projects EMR GPS NAvigation Artist Book 2.0 Traveler Driver Prototyping Tool ICT4D
    • 8. Projects EMR GPS NAvigation Prototyping Tool Artist Book 2.0 ICT4D Traveler Driver
    • 9. Understanding in-car ssmarrtpphoonne UUsaggee Pattteerrn
    • 10. CHI 2014 work-In-Progress
    • 11. Supported by SAMSUNG ELECTRONICS dMC UX Center
    • 12. BACKGROUND Smartphone Offers the Same Service regardless of Users’ Context and Situation. ! ! ! ! ! Driving
    • 13. “AS IS” Approaches Supporting Technically • are not sufficient to solve this problem. • cannot fully support driver’s information needs and don’t reflect the distinctiveness or issues of driving context. Prohibiting Legally • simply legally prohibiting cannot be a fundamental solution. • providing appropriate ways of satisfying their needs should be concerned instead.
    • 14. “AS IS” Approaches Supporting Technically • • insufficient to solve this problem • cannot fully support driver’s information needs and don’t The driver’s distinct information behavior reflect the distinctiveness or issues of driving context is worth analyzing in peculiar. Prohibiting Legally • simply legally prohibiting cannot be a fundamental solution. • providing appropriate ways of satisfying their needs should be concerned instead.
    • 15. We aimed to… • investigate the information behaviors of drivers based on in-vehicle smartphone usages in situ. ! • classify their information activities in a meta-level. ! • induce design implications that would be helpful to smartphone services in cars or new ways of car interactions in the future.
    • 16. METHODOLOGY
    • 17. Real Daily Driving Trips 14 drivers in the Seoul Metropolitan Area Three days
    • 18. Data Gathering 1. An In-Car Video Recording System for quAlitative data 2. AppCatcher for Quantitative dAta
    • 19. Data Gathering 50 Analyzable Trip Data × 50 A Trip • Total: 32h 59m 58s • Average: about 40min per Trip
    • 20. Data Analysis Repetitive Video Recording Clips Coding & Ideation Process + Application Usage Logs
    • 21. Data Analysis Repetitive Coding & Ideation Process
    • 22. Results
    • 23. What is “Session?” • A combination of elements from when a driver picks up a smartphone until he/she puts it down. • Each sessions possess distinguishing characteristics and has sub-elements such as initiating way, application, action, interaction, duration, situation. ! ! Initiating way Action Duration ! ! Application Interaction Etc… ! A Session ! ! • The total of 139 sessions was observed.
    • 24. Five “Sessions” of Smartphone Usage in Cars
    • 25. Five “Sessions” of Smartphone Usage in Cars Cycling Through
    • 26. Five “Sessions” of Smartphone Usage in Cars Coming Up With Cycling Through
    • 27. Five “Sessions” of Smartphone Usage in Cars Active Pursuing Coming Up With Cycling Through
    • 28. Five “Sessions” of Smartphone Usage in Cars Active Pursuing Coming Up With Cycling Through Conversing
    • 29. Five “Sessions” of Smartphone Usage in Cars Active Pursuing Coming Up With Cycling Through Conversing Deferring
    • 30. CYCLING THROUGH Habitually turning on the smartphone and drifting aimlessly
    • 31. CYCLING THROUGH
    • 32. CYCLING THROUGH (10%) Duration: Short (12~60s) Habitual Connection
    • 33. COMING UP WITH Conducting information behavior by using smartphone as something Suddenly comes to Driver’s mind
    • 34. COMING UP WITH
    • 35. Duration: Long (1~5m) COMING UP WITH (9%)
    • 36. Active Pursuing Concentrating on using smartphone for a longer time in order to complete information behaviors related with specific purposes
    • 37. Active Pursuing
    • 38. Duration: Long (1~5m) Active Pursuing (18%)
    • 39. Conversing communicating with others by using communication apps such as telephone call, mobile instant messenger(MIM) and SNS
    • 40. Conversing
    • 41. Habitual Connection Duration: Long Conversing (56%)
    • 42. Deferring Avoiding or postponing a response toward push notification in the smartphone
    • 43. Deferring
    • 44. Unfinished Very Short Deferring (5%)
    • 45. “VOICE OF DRIVERS”
    • 46. “VOICE OF DRIVERS” • Additionally gathered “Voice of Drivers” by doing Think-aloud while driving and conducting half-open survey after the experiment. ! • Organized them into four issues. Voice Interaction Habitual Traits Modality Safety
    • 47. Voice interaction • need for voice interaction ! “I don’t know if such functions already exist, but I wish my phone could be changed like ‘driving mode’ before I start driving. Then, I can use my voice for all the functions.” ! “I’d like a system where I can answer the message by voice, even simply. Also, when message arrive while driving, it would be convenient if there’s a service that reads it out loud.”
    • 48. Habitual Traits • (1) setting and (2) dealing with backlogs ! “I drive, after I start the car and choose the music” ! “Before I drive to work, I check the messages or SNS alarms that are piled up from the night before to the morning… and I answer to KakaoTalk messages after I finish driving.” !
    • 49. Modality • a variety of needs for additional interface ! “It’s very inconvenient because I need my hands for both driving and using the smartphone. I wish there were something that can control my smartphone on the steering wheel. And I wish I can get my calls easily like folder phones” ! “I want my windshield to show the smartphone screen” ! “I want a sort of ‘driving mode’ in my phone in which the letters get bigger”
    • 50. Safety • restraint of information activities !“I usually hold back the usage of smartphone. If I should, I slowly start the apps when it’s safe” ! ! • changes in the forms of smartphone usage ! “I look at my smartphone in one hand in a glimpse, placing it in the middle of my wheel.”
    • 51. Conclusion
    • 52. DESIGN IMPLICATIONS 1. Providing relevant update at an appropriate time 2. Communicating selectively and integrally 3. Introducing new interaction that does not hamper attention and safety 4. Capturing immediate thoughts
    • 53. CONTRIBUTIONS • Tried to observe “real” information behaviors of drivers ! • Introduced the concept of “Session”— the meta level categorization unit ! • Induced design implications applicable to smart devices in cars or smart car related services
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