Interview with Gerd Winkler from Continental

How can the industry overcome the challenge of reducing power consumption,

  1. Torben Haagh
    How can the industry overcome the challenge of reducing power consumption,
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    Interview with Gerd Winkler from Continental
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    • 1. Automotive IQ editor, Will Hornick recently spoke with Gerd Winkler, who is responsible for Continental's new Powertrain Electronic Control Platform. Their discussion focused on multi-core processors. Please describe your background and your role at Continental. After being in the automotive industry for more than 15 years, I executed a transition from 8bit to 32bit micro controller architectures in several fields like Chassis and Safety as well as Powertrain. Today I am responsible for Continental's new Powertrain Electronic Control Platform, utilizing our multicore SW implementation PowerSAR(R) based on AUTOSAR at Continental Powertrain. My educational Background is Electrical Engineering with a strong affinity for embedded systems and software, as well as an MBA. Could you share with us why there is a push toward developing for multi-core processors specifically in your area of powertrain development? As my current focus is on Powertrain systems, we do see permanently growing demand of throughput due to more complex Powertrain topologies. This is primarily driven by emission legislation and fuel economy targets in Europe and US. To reach these targets, more and more holistic approaches are required, combining new technologies in combustion engines with smart electrification of subsystems or hybridization of the entire Powertrain. New control strategies and much tighter real time needs are one consequence for electronic control units. At the same time, the overall electronic system needs to contribute to manageable power consumption as well. Just to increase the micro controller clock frequency will result in non-desired cooling approaches at chip level as well as on the control module. Shrinking the digital semiconductor structures alone will not compensate enough. Parallel computation seems to be an adequate response to the dilemma.
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