Green bezold effect

Bezold Effect

  1. Thomas Everett Green
    Bezold Effect
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    Green bezold effect
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    • 1. Bezold Effect Thomas Green
    • 2. Wilhelm Von Bezold, A 19th Century Rug Designer, Discovered an OPTICAL INTERACTION Effect, Which Now Carries His Name, The BEZOLD EFFECT. He Found That He Could Change the Entire Appearance of His Designs by Substituting a Different Color For the Color Which Occupied the Most Area.
    • 3. When looking at a specific hue, it can appear to change in appearance depending on the colors that surround it. For example, a yellow box surrounded by blue will look darker than a yellow box surrounded by red. Often, the surrounded color seems to take on a tint of the color that surrounds it; red boxes surrounded by blue will appear more bluish than those surrounded by white. The clearest demonstration is when two patches of identical color are surrounded by thin black and white borders respectively. The one surrounded by black appears darker than the one surrounded by white. The colored regions assimilate their border color; the opposite of the contrast effect often found with brightness, and also with hue. Bezold Effect
    • 4. Bezold Effect Wilhelm von Bezold (1837-1907) discovered that a color may appear different depending on its relation to adjacent colors. Bezold discovered that contrary to the already established finding of "simultaneous color contrast" in which a color takes on the complimentary hue and contrasting brightness of its surroundings, Bezold discovered that under certain circumstances a colored region will take on the same color as its surround.
    • 5. For Monday Create and title simple abstract compositional sketches that express a particular feeling or mood. Be specific about the mood/feeling to be conveyed. Color Studies : Mood Outside Assignment: Mood • Create and title a simple composition based on your in class studies that defines for you a particular feeling or mood. Be specific about the mood/feeling you are attempting to convey. Write it down and do not share the mood that you wish to express with anyone except the instructor. • Keeping in mind the Bezold Effect make a second version of your composition that, through the substitution of one color produces the opposite feeling or mood. • Materials: Gouache/ Color-aid paper • Mount your 6” x 9” studies on 8” x 11” Bristol. Use a 1” border. Craft is important. Keep border clean. • Write your name and the emotion expressed on the back of each piece.
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